New York Archaeology Council

NYAC Website

The New York Archaeological Council (NYAC) was founded to raise awareness of archaeology and archaeological issues of New York State: to provide information of general interest on the history and prehistory of New York as well as about the field of archaeology that provides insight into that history, to provide educational resources about archaeology, to provide information on the conduct of professional archaeology in New York, to serve as a point of reference for anyone that needs to consider archaeological resources in compliance with various laws and regulations that often come into play during construction projects, and to increase the awareness of New York Archaeology to the general public.

New York Archaeology Announcements

Native American, Climatic, and Environmental Influences on Pine Barrens and Other Fire-Adapted Ecosystems of New York State

Albert Fulton, a Funk Foundation recipient, will present a free and open-to-the-public talk on his research October 19th at 6:30 PM at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center, 195 New Karmer Rd., Albany, NY 12205. His presentation is titled: Native American, Climatic, and Environmental Influences on Pine Barrens and Other Fire-Adapted Ecosystems of New York State

Presentation by Albert Fulton, Ph.D. Candidate, Dept. of Geography, Michigan State University. Mr. Fulton’s research is supported by a grant for radiocarbon dating from the Robert E. Funk Memorial Archaeology Foundation, Inc. His Ph.D. research involves environmental reconstruction for the last several thousand years in the Genesee Valley region.

New York Archaeology Association

NYSAA Website

The New York State Archaeological Association (NYSAA) is composed of avocational and professional archaeologists primarily within New York State, though some of its members can be found throughout the world. NYSAA stands to promote archaeological and historical study, and research covering the artifacts, rites, customs, beliefs and other phases of the lives and cultures of the American Indian occupants of New York State up to and including their contact with the Europeans. Recently, the Association has expanded its focus to include research upon Euro-American archaeological sites post-dating European Contact.