New York Archaeology Council

NYAC Website

The New York Archaeological Council (NYAC) was founded to raise awareness of archaeology and archaeological issues of New York State: to provide information of general interest on the history and prehistory of New York as well as about the field of archaeology that provides insight into that history, to provide educational resources about archaeology, to provide information on the conduct of professional archaeology in New York, to serve as a point of reference for anyone that needs to consider archaeological resources in compliance with various laws and regulations that often come into play during construction projects, and to increase the awareness of New York Archaeology to the general public.

New York Archaeology AnnouncementsNYAC Fall Meeting

The Fall meeting of the New York Archaeological Council be held Saturday, October 22, 2016 at SUNY Binghamton. The NYAC Board will meet from 10-12. If you have an issue you wish the board to consider please emailĀ  it to Doug Perrelli, President ( so that it can be added to the agenda. The General Meeting at will meet from 1-2:45. All are welcome to attend and to discuss issues under consideration.

The Program will take place from 3-5. The spring meeting resulted in the creation of a draft of guidelines for the SHPO’s office on culling and sampling of archaeological materials. The program will be an opportunity for you to review the draft and comment.

NYAC 2016 Directions to Campus (9.4 KiB)

NYAC Binghamton Map (1.9 MiB)

New York Archaeology Association

NYSAA Website

The New York State Archaeological Association (NYSAA) is composed of avocational and professional archaeologists primarily within New York State, though some of its members can be found throughout the world. NYSAA stands to promote archaeological and historical study, and research covering the artifacts, rites, customs, beliefs and other phases of the lives and cultures of the American Indian occupants of New York State up to and including their contact with the Europeans. Recently, the Association has expanded its focus to include research upon Euro-American archaeological sites post-dating European Contact.